Why Trump Will Not Make America Great Again

Photo by Gage Skidmore

Donald Trump’s catchphrase is “I’m gonna make America great again.” On the surface, he’s got a lot to back it up. He’s a wealthy businessman. He knows how to handle a crowd, get attention, and say the right words to fire up crowds. He’s moderately conservative, with ultra-conservative stances on immigration balanced out with moderate stances on Planned Parenthood, guns, and gay rights, thus well-positioned to keep the right happy while stealing moderate voters from the left.

But his ‘ability’ to “make America great again” is shallow, and doesn’t stand up to scrutiny. His business savvy and crowd appeal is only a mirage. Even supposing he manages to make the Republican nomination, and by a miracle beats the Democratic nominee, his four years in office will sink America’s foreign policy and financial policy. Continue reading →

My take on the Stoa Spring Vote 2015 – Part 4 – TP resolutions

Carter_and_Ford_in_a_debate,_September_23,_1976

So, the Stoa 2015 Spring Vote items are out, and you’re wondering what you should vote for. Here is a brief analysis of each item on the ballot this May. We last looked at the four proposed LD resolutions. Let’s now briefly go over the three proposed TP resolutions.

I am not a team policy debater, so I’m only going to compile the sentiments I’ve heard expressed in social media, etc.

Team Policy Debate Resolutions – Stoa Speech and Debate

Dear Team Policy Debaters, 1. The United States federal government should substantially increase its engagement toward the People’s Republic of China. 2. Resolved: That the United States federal government should substantially change its policy toward one or more private or federal retirement programs in the United States.

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My take on the Stoa Spring Vote 2015 – Part 3 – LD resolutions

By Kirk Bravender

So, the Stoa 2015 Spring Vote items are out, and you’re wondering what you should vote for. Here is a brief analysis of each item on the ballot this May. We last looked at OI vs. Storytelling. Let’s take a look at the four proposed LD resolutions. Look for a discussion about the TP resolutions later on.

Lincoln Douglas Value Debate Resolutions – Stoa Speech and Debate

Vote: For Two of the Resolutions Developing countries ought to prioritize economic growth over environmental protection. 4. Resolved: The use of economic sanctions to achieve U.S. foreign policy goals is moral. The key to this resolution is the word moral. The word goals implies a level of pragmatism, so is this a directly pragmatic question?

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My take on the Stoa Spring Vote 2015 – Part 2 – Speech events

By Brian Talbot

So, the Stoa 2015 Spring Vote items are out, and you’re wondering what you should vote for. Here is a brief analysis of each item on the ballot this May. We last looked at the wildcard candidates. Let’s take a look at the vote on whether to replace Open Interp with Storytelling. Look for a discussion about the LD resolutions later on.

Speech Event Option – Stoa Speech and Debate

Storytelling is a highly valuable skill and event for a number of reasons including encouraging competitors to improve their ability to craft pertinent, relatable and engaging tales. Stories and narratives have been shared in every culture as a means of entertainment, education, cultural preservation, and instilling moral values.

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My take on the Stoa Spring Vote 2015 – Part 1 – Wildcard

By ieshraq

So, the Stoa 2015 Spring Vote items are out, and you’re wondering what you should vote for. Here is a brief analysis of each item on the ballot this May, starting now with the next wildcard. Look for a discussion about Open Interp vs. Storytelling later on.

Wildcard – Stoa Speech and Debate

Description : A monologue is a memorized speech from a single character. The competitor interprets a monologue from a single published source. No original material for the monologue selection is allowed. A portion of the presentation may include a brief analysis, background, and context of the monologue.

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